Little Lives

In the beginning, God created the Earth, a lifeless ball of dirt. It was ugly and uninspired. God drew on the heavens with fire and gas and dust, searching for the key to make this ball of dirt spectacular. Finally, God realized the only way to make the Earth truly beautiful was to put Him/Her/Itself in it. God cut a piece of Him/Her/Itself off and buried it deep within the Earth. As the mass divided, the Earth sprang to life with color and motion, each beautiful little autonomous streak of brilliance a piece of God. At first, the little lives remained attached to the ground from which they grew. But they craved each other, the small pieces aching to be a part of the bigger, the greater, the original. Soon many of the little lives grew legs and began walking around the Earth in search of other parts of the greater. But this separation from God’s creation was never long lasting. The little lives would quickly loose strength, to only return to the ground from which they came. Rebel lives learned that a life separated from God’s creation could be sustained by feeding off the life which continued to grow from the ground. Still, the sustenance only prolonged the inevitable arrival of their return to the Earth. The electricity which flowed through them so abundantly as they first sprang from the Earth diminished significantly as time passed. The great source of sustenance from the ground proved to be nothing more than a clever way of putting off their inevitable return to the Earth. Being away from God and His/Her/It’s creation caused pain. As the little lives spent more time away from the Earth, they forgot God, they forgot their lives before. This led to fear and competition for sustenance. Still, in desperate craving of a connection to God, the little lives roamed the Earth, in search of other little lives who would share in their burden of finding sustenance. Although the little lives had no recollection of God, they had great evidence of His/Her/It’s existence. The different interpretations of the evidence led them to fight and kill each other, believing the act of dying to be one a little life should fear the most. They feared and fought and killed and died and returned to the Earth from which they came only to suddenly remember there was never any need to fear or fight or kill or die.

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